The University of Arizona

Graduate Courses

VSC 500A– Animal Anatomy and Physiology (3 Units)
Description:     This is one of two 3-unit lecture/demonstration courses which comprise a 2-semester sequence of animal anatomy and physiology course work which is required for graduation with a major in Veterinary Science. They may be completed in any order. The anatomy portion of these courses is not a traditional type anatomy course which requires that the student name each and every vessel or muscle, etc. and where it originates and terminates. It is more a treatise on "functional anatomy" which will give the learner an appreciation of how the body component is put together (morphology) thus dictating how it may properly function (physiology). Emphasis is placed upon the systemic or whole animal operational levels rather than the precise biochemical and physical intricacies associated with the individual parts or cells which make up that whole. Students will gain an appreciation of how the various domestic species are put together and how they function and the interrelationships of the parts and systems which allow the individuals to thrive in their environment. Some consideration will also be given to what happens to the individual when form or function goes awry to illustrate the importance of the norm. Emphasis will be placed upon the common domestic and pet mammalian species with selected references to wild species, birds and primates where appropriate.
Offered:          Fall
 
VSC 500B-- Animal Anatomy and Physiology (3 Units)
This is one of two 3-unit lecture/demonstration courses which comprise a 2-semester sequence of animal anatomy and physiology course work which is required for graduation with a major in Veterinary Science. They may be completed in any order. The anatomy portion of these courses is not a traditional type anatomy course which requires that the student name each and every vessel or muscle, etc. and where it originates and terminates. It is more a treatise on "functional anatomy" which will give the learner an appreciation of how the body component is put together (morphology) thus dictating how it may properly function (physiology). Emphasis is placed upon the systemic or whole animal operational levels rather than the precise biochemical and physical intricacies associated with the individual parts or cells which make up that whole. Students will gain an appreciation of how the various domestic species are put together and how they function and the interrelationships of the parts and systems which allow the individuals to thrive in their environment. Some consideration will also be given to what happens to the individual when form or function goes awry to illustrate the importance of the norm. Emphasis will be placed upon the common domestic and pet mammalian species with selected references to wild species, birds and primates where appropriate.
Offered:          Spring
 
MIC/VSC 503R– Biology of Animal Parasites (3 Units)
Description:     Biology of host-parasite relationships with emphasis on parasites of veterinary and human importance. Parasite morphology and physiology, life cycles, epidemiology, pathogenesis and zoonotic potential.
Offered:          Fall
Department of Record:           VSC
 
VSC 505– Principles of Livestock Health Management (3 Units)
Description:     Survey of selected diseases of horses, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. Includes basic coverage of mechanisms of infectious disease, immunology, infectious agents, diagnostic techniques as well as the relationship of husbandry and management to the occurrence of livestock disease. Disease topics covered will include a wide range of infectious and non-infectious diseases (including nutritional deficiencies and important toxins and toxicants) affecting livestock. A basic course covering the animal industry (e.g. Animal Science 102 or equivalent) is recommended.
Offered:          Spring
 
VSC 509– Evolution of Infectious Disease (3 Units)
Description:     Causes and consequences of evolutionary change in pathogens.  Evolutionary principles, vertebrate immunity, molecular epidemiology, evolution of virulence, evolution of antimicrobial resistance, predicting epidemics, impacts of infectious disease on host evolution, HIV evolution.
Offered:          Fall
Department of Record:           ECOL
 
MIC/VSC 519– General Immunological Concepts (4 Units)
Description:     Basic concepts of the immune system. Presentation of the roles of antigen, immunoglobulins, complement, lymphokines and role of immune cells play in humoral and cell-mediated immunity.
Offered:          Spring
 
MIC/VSC 520– Pathogenic Bacteriology (3 Units)
Description:     Etiology and pathogenesis of bacterial diseases in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife.
Offered:          Fall
Department of Record:           VSC
 
VSC 523– Mechanisms of Disease (5 Units)
Description:     Comparative general pathology of animal and selected human diseases with emphasis on pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and morphologic and biochemical changes at the macroscopic, microscopic and molecular levels. Recitation will stress general mechanisms of disease common to all mammalian species, with focus on tissue injury and adaptation; inflammation and repair; and disorders of circulation, immunity, and cell growth, including neoplasia. Laboratory will reinforce recitation and stress practical, hands-on recognition of disease in organs and tissues at the gross and microscopic levels.  Available for honors credit.  Graduate-level requirements will include outside discussion and preparation of a research proposal on a relevant topic emphasizing the molecular pathogenesis of selected infectious diseases and currently applicable biotechniques, and critical analysis of related publications from the current literature.
Offered:         Spring
 
VSC527R– General Mycology (3 Units)
Description:     An exploration of the diversity of fungi and fungus like organisms covering general biology and roles as pathogens (of humans and plants), saprobes and symbionts. Fungi as models for eukaryotic molecular research and their uses in industry will be covered.  Graduate-level requirements include a term paper 10 pages in length to allow a more in depth exploration of a topic in fungal biology.  Also required is a 30 minute oral presentation on a topic of choice for 100 points of grade.
Offered:          Fall
Department of Record:           PLP
 
MIC 528LMicrobial Genetics Laboratory (2 Units)
Description:     Laboratory associated with lecture course on Prokaryotic gene structure and function; methods of gene transfer and mapping, DNA structure, replication, transcription, and translation. Hands-on computer analysis of DNA sequences and gene cloning strategies. Principles of regulation of gene expression. Biology of plasmids and bacteriophages.  Graduate-level requirements include the DNA sequence of an entire operon from any one of a variety of bacteria and additionally analyze one product from the operon using several GCG protein analysis programs. Also extra exam questions.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:           PLP
 
MIC 528RMicrobial Genetics (3 Units)
Description:     Prokaryotic gene structure and function; methods of gene transfer and mapping, DNA structure, replication, transcription, and translation. Hands-on computer analysis of DNA sequences and gene cloning strategies. Principles of regulation of gene expression. Biology of plasmids and bacteriophages.  Graduate-level requirements include a DNA sequence of an entire operon from any one of a variety of bacteria and additionally analyze one product from the operon using several GCG protein analysis programs plus an extensive exam.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:           PLP
 
MIC 530Food Microbiology and Biotechnology (3 Units)
Description:     Food microbiology and biotechnology course will provide an introduction to the microorganisms of importance in foods, both beneficial and harmful, and application of biotechnology in foods.  The focus of this course will be on microorganisms and other agents causing foodborne illnesses, the use of microorganisms in food production, role of regulatory agencies in foodborne outbreak investigations, and detection and prevention of food spoilage and pathogenic organisms using various methods including those from chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology. The practical difficulties of how the knowledge gained from research studies can be applied to a variety of fields in food microbiology and technology will be explored. The course will consist of a mixture of lectures by the instructor/guest lecturers, and presentation and subsequent group discussions of assigned readings.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:          MIC
Course Requisites:      ANS 380
 
MIC/VSC 533– Medical and Molecular Virology (4 Units)
Description:     Structure, classification, replication, and mechanisms of pathogenesis of human and animal viruses.  Graduate-level requirements include an additional discussion hour per week.
Offered:          Fall
Department of Record:           MIC
 
MIC/VSC 538– Ecology of Infectious Disease (3 Units)
Description:     Term paper required for graduate credit.
Offered:          Spring
 
VSC 543– Research Animal Methods (3 Units)
Description:     Regulations, care, diseases and techniques involving common laboratory animals used in research and teaching programs.  Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on one of the lecture topics presented in the course plus research proposal preparation.
Offered:          Fall
 
MIC/VSC 546– Insect Pathogens: Biocontrol Agents and Biological Models (4 Units)
Description:     Ecology and biology of insect pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoa, nematodes).  Diagnostics, safety testing of pathogens.  Genomics and genetic engineering of entomopathogens.  Insect pathogens as biological model organisms.  Applications in medical and veterinary research and pharmaceutical bioprospecting.  Graduate-level requirements include students to prepare and give one oral presentation of a specific topic that will be coordinated with the instructor at the beginning of the course. Topics considered in the oral presentations will be included in the final exam.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:           ENTO
 
VSC 549– Disease of Wildlife (3 Units)
Description:     Important diseases of wildlife. Immunity, disease mechanisms, infectious agents, diagnostic procedures, and post-mortem techniques as well as a survey of selected but generally well-recognized diseases of wildlife.  Graduate-level requirements include a class presentation for which students will review the literature and prepare and present a lecture on a wildlife disease topic to the class.
Offered:          Fall
 
MIC 552Antibiotics – A Biological Perspective (3 Units)
Description:     Antibiotics - a biological perspective provides an introduction to the major classes of antibiotics, their modes of action, the threat and reality of antibiotic resistant "superbugs", as well as the biosynthesis, microbiological role, discovery, and industrial production of these compounds.  The course will concentrate on the microbiological, genetic, and molecular biological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance, with less emphasis on chemistry. Thus, it complements but does not replace other courses that may detail the chemical synthesis and medicinal chemistry of these compounds, or concentrate on their medical or veterinary application as drugs.  The course is designed to increase the awareness and appreciation of the importance of antibiotics and anti-infective research in an age when:  cheap and failsafe antibiotic cures are considered a birthright in developed countries while lacking in the rest of the world; antibiotic use and misuse is prevalent in medicine, veterinary practice, and agriculture; antibiotic agents increasingly lose effectiveness due to emerging resistance; and anti-infective research has been severely curtailed by pharmaceutical companies.  Graduate-level requirements include a published peer-reviewed scientific paper pertinent to antibiotic research for reading and for preparing Critical Summaries and a presentation on a selected antibiotic.
Offered:          Fall
 
MIC/VSC 554– Host-Microbial Interactions (3 Units)
Description:     Review of bacterial-host interactions with the emphasis on mucosal immunity following bacterial infection. Important issues such as molecular mechanisms of virulence factors, bacterial resistance to host factors, immune modulation, and regulation of the host response to bacterial assault will be discussed.  Graduate-level requirements include a five-page proposal.
Offered:          Spring, every other year
Department of Record:           MIC
 
VSC 556– Aquaculture (3 Units)
Description:     Overview lectures and assigned readings on the theory and practice of aquaculture. Includes the culture of seaweeds, mollusks, crustaceans, and finfish.  Graduate-level requirements include a topic report.
Offered:          Spring
 
VSC 565Shrimp Pathology (3 Units)
Description:     Comprehensive lectures and practical laboratory training on the current methods used to diagnose, prevent and treat the principal diseases of cultured penaeid shrimp.
Offered:          Summer 1 and Summer 2
 
MIC 573– Recombinant DNA Methods and Applications (4 Units)
Description:     Relevant techniques for the isolation, purification, and cloning of genes in E. Coli hosts.  Eukaryotic lambda genomic DNA clones will be characterized by restriction mapping, hybridization analysis, and sequence analysis.  Graduate-level requirements include a one hour discussion section of classic and recent papers featuring major advances in molecular biology or their application to current issues or problems.
Offered:          Fall and Spring
Department of Record:           MCB
 
MIC/VSC 595A– Critical Evaluation of Scientific Literature (1 Unit)
Description:     This course is designed specifically for graduate students interested in infectious disease, pathobiology, or microbiology. The objective of this class is to critically evaluate scientific papers and to introduce students to scientific discussion. Each student is required to present a scientific paper to the class. The purpose of the presentation is to describe, and critically review, the salient points of a paper and to lead discussion of the paper's content.
Offered:          Fall and Spring
Department of Record:           MIC
 
MIC/VSC 611– Comparative Virology (3 Units)
Description:     A comprehensive course covering broad-ranging aspects of modern virology with an emphasis on comparisons between representative virus groups, taking into account different host, tissue, cell, and vector tropisms, and modes of transmission. The team of instructors will highlight representative types of viruses across different life forms to encourage and illuminate inter-group comparisons in discussion sessions lead by the graduate students.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:           PLP
 
VSC 660– Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3 Units)
Description:     Introduction to epidemiologic methods used in infectious disease investigations. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationships between the host, the parasite and the environment as they relate disease causation.
Offered:          Spring
Department of Record:           EPI
 
MIC/VSC696A– Research Seminar (1 Unit)
Description:     The exchange of scholarly information and various research topics via a presentation and discussion format. The scope of work is presented by current graduate students, departmental and UA professors, and invited researchers. All graduate students in the department must attend. Please note: graduate student registration for the course requires a presentation of a masters report, thesis or dissertation within the semester.
Offered:          Fall and Spring
 
MIC/VSC 900– Research (1-9 Units)
Description:     Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
Offered:          Fall, Spring, and Summer 1 and 2
 
VSC 909– Master’s Report (1-8 Units)
Description:     Individual study or special project or formal report thereof submitted in lieu of thesis for certain master's degrees.
Offered:          Fall, Spring, and Summer 1 and 2
 
MIC/VSC 910– Thesis (1-6 Units)
Description:     Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
Offered:          Fall, Spring, and Summer 1 and 2
 
MIC/VSC 920– Dissertation (1-9 Units)
Description:     Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
Offered:          Fall, Spring, and Summer 1 and 2